Women, Islam and the State

by Deniz Kandiyoti
published in MER173

Please Subscribe to access the full contents of this article.

Amin, Eurocentrism

by Georg Stauth
published in MER174

Samir Amin, Eurocentrism (trans. Russell Moore) (Monthly Review Press, 1989).

The awakening of the Third World and the formation of nation states in the former colonies has brought about a liberalizing philosophy of cultural affirmation of local traditions. One could conveniently characterize this process as a reaction to Western cultural domination from the colonial era. Samir Amin argues that “Eurocentrism” today operates not only as a form of external domination but also as a mechanism of cultural formation within non-European cultures.

Please Subscribe to access the full contents of this article.

Al-Naqeeb, State and Society in the Gulf

by Roger Owen
published in MER174

Khaldoun Hasan Al-Naqeeb, State and Society in the Gulf and Arab Peninsula: A Different Perspective (trans. L. M. Kenny and amended Ibrahim Hayani) (Routledge, 1990).

Please Subscribe to access the full contents of this article.

How Israel Gets Its Credit Rating

by Fareed Mohamedi
published in MER175

A “C” rating from the US government credit evaluators, coming after Washington has held up the $10 billion loan guarantee for more than four months, must come as something of a shock for Israel. Only last September Jacob Frenkel, governor of the Bank of Israel, told the Financial Times that a “good borrower like Israel” needed the loan guarantees to “go to the marketplace with an implicit vote of confidence in the economy, its prospects, and in the economic strategy that it has.”

Please Subscribe to access the full contents of this article.

Halliday, Revolution and Foreign Policy

by Sheila Carapico
published in MER179

Fred Halliday, Revolution and Foreign Policy: The Case of South Yemen, 1967-1987 (Cambridge, 1990).

Please Subscribe to access the full contents of this article.

Contested Space

Urban Settlement Around Amman

by Omar Razzaz
published in MER181

Dispossession, displacement, migration and precarious living conditions are intimately connected phenomena. Lines of causality run in every direction. Those enduring such conditions, in their determination to establish some roots and some sense of community, somewhere, often find themselves in violation of the “laws of the land.” They are in overcrowded quarters violating some rule about density in substandard housing violating some housing code, on agricultural land violating land use regulations, or on land legally claimed by others.

Migrants, Workers and Refugees

The Political Economy of Population Movements in the Middle East

by Michael Humphrey
published in MER181

The outset of the Gulf crisis in August 1990 saw a dramatic exodus of more than a million Asian and Arab workers as well as some 460,000 Kuwaitis from Iraq and Kuwait. Perhaps a million Yemenis felt compelled to leave Saudi Arabia. During the civil war in Iraq that followed the ground war, a million and a half Iraqi Kurds and tens of thousands of Iraqi Arabs in the southern part of the country fled to Turkey or Iran, or were displaced within Iraq’s own borders.

Please Subscribe to access the full contents of this article.

Studies of Structural Adjustment

by Marsha Pripstein Posusney
published in MER184

Bent Hansen, Egypt and Turkey: The Political Economy of Poverty, Equity and Growth (World Bank, 1991).

Heba Handoussa and Gilliam Potter, eds. Employment and Structural Adjustment: Egypt in the 1990s (AUC, 1991).

Mustafa Kamil al-Sayyid, “Privatization: The Egyptian Debate,” Cairo Papers in Social Science 13/4 (Winter 1990).

Please Subscribe to access the full contents of this article.

The Economic Dimension of Yemeni Unity

by Sheila Carapico
published in MER184

To the outside world, the unification of the two Yemens in 1990 resembled the German experience in miniature. North Yemen (the Yemen Arab Republic, YAR) was considered a laissez faire market economy, whereas the South (the People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen, PDRY) was “the communist one.” When, weeks ahead of Bonn and Berlin, Sanaa and Aden announced their union, Western commentary assumed that in Yemen, as in Germany, capitalist (Northern) firms would buy out the moribund (Southern) state sector and provide the basis for future economic growth.

Please Subscribe to access the full contents of this article.