Violence and its Rhetoric

Sharon and the US

by Rebecca L. Stein | published March 28, 2001

Sharon's National Unity Government

Shoring Up the "Iron Wall"

by Jeff Halper | published March 13, 2001

No-Fly Zones

Rhetoric and Real Intentions

by Sarah Graham-Brown | published February 20, 2001

Caught in the Middle

Women and Press Freedom in Iran

by Persheng Vaziri | published February 16, 2001

Ethiopia-Eritrea Peace Process Creeps Forward

by Dan Connell | published February 14, 2001

Two months after Eritrea and Ethiopia signed a pact to end their two-year border war, an agreement to move ahead with its implementation has finally been ironed out. The 4,000 UN troops brought here to monitor the truce are preparing for deployment to the contested frontier. Meanwhile, hundreds of thousands of war-displaced civilians remain in camps behind the lines, waiting to see if the truce will hold.

Israel Elects Sharon

Contradictions of a Creeping Apartheid

by Oren Yiftachel | published February 12, 2001

Iran's Conservatives Face the Electorate

by Arang Keshavarzian | published February 1, 2001

In May, Iranians will go to the polls to pass judgment on the record of President Mohammad Khatami and the reform movement he symbolizes. Although observers of Iran typically characterize the Islamic Republic's factional divisions as a single left-right split dividing the regime into unified "reformist" and "conservative" blocs, a multitude of potential cleavages belie this simple dichotomy. Since the 1979 revolution, a variety of opinions have existed within the regime's accepted confines.

Almost Unnoticed

Interventions and Rivalries in Iraqi Kurdistan

by Isam al-Khafaji | published January 24, 2001

The Case of Azmi Bishara

Political Immunity and Freedom in Israel

by Gad Barzilai | published January 9, 2001

Beyond the Bibi Bill

Israel's Electoral System and the Intifada

by Jeff Halper | published December 19, 2000

December 18 the Knesset partially amended Israel's electoral law—the so-called "Bibi bill"—allowing Binyamin Netanyahu to run against Ehud Barak for prime minister. The law had stipulated that when a government resigns, as Barak's did December 9, elections are held for the prime ministership only, and that only Knesset members may present their candidacy. By the amendment, Netanyahu, who resigned from the Knesset after his 1999 defeat, could have run.