The Egyptian Women's Health Book Collective

by Nadia Farah
published in MER173

The publication of the Boston Women’s Health Book Collective’s famous and controversial book Our Bodies, Ourselves (1976) created wide repercussions and charted a way for women all over the world to gain personal control, through the possession of objective and necessary information, over their own bodies, health status and lives.

A group of interested Egyptian women started to meet in May 1985, with the idea of finding ways to spread the message of the book to Egyptian and Arab women. They agreed to form a collective to produce a similar book in Arabic.

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Women, Islam and the State

by Deniz Kandiyoti
published in MER173

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Gender and Political Change

by Julie Peteet , Barbara Harlow
published in MER173

‘Aziza the Alexandrian is serving a life sentence in her women’s prison in Egypt for the murder of her mother’s husband. ‘Aziza, the main character in Salwa Bakr’s novel The Golden Chariot Won’t Ascend to the Heavens, assassinated this man who had seduced her as well as her mother, and then, following her mother’s death, took another woman as his wife. [1] She plans to flee the prison in a golden chariot destined for the heavens, but she does not plan to leave alone. Bakr’s novel presents the other women prisoners elected to accompany her, 12 life histories that have warranted them a place in ‘Aziza’s chariot.

Egyptian Women and the Politics of Protest

by Joel Beinin
published in MER176

In recent years to veiling of Muslim women has become a common image associated with radical Islamist politics. Yet in Accommodating Protest: Working Women, the New Veiling and Change in Cairo (Columbia, 1990) Arlene Macleod demonstrates that lower middle-class women in Cairo who wear the hijab (new veil) rarely identify with radical Islam. This outstanding book combines feminist privileging of women’s experiences with imaginative deployment of social theory. Macleod’s approach is akin to that of Ph.D. theses by Diane Singerman and Homa Hoodfar that also integrate women’s testimony with gendered class analysis.

Qashqa'i Nomads and the Islamic Republic

by Lois Beck
published in MER177

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Three Intifada Books

by Lucine Taminian
published in MER179

F. Robert Hunter, The Palestinian Uprising: A War by Other Means (I. B. Tauris, 1991).

Joost Hiltermann, Behind the Intifada: Labor and Women’s Movements in the Occupied Territories (Princeton, 1991).

Julie Peteet, Gender in Crisis: Women and the Palestinian Resistance Movement (Columbia, 1991).

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Aspects of Egyptian Civil Resistance

by Joel Beinin
published in MER179

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The Islamist State and Sudanese Women

by Ellen Gruenbaum
published in MER179

The Islamist government in Sudan recently celebrated the third anniversary of the military coup that brought it to power by building a huge public park south of the Khartoum airport, featuring hundreds of hurriedly transplanted trees, bushes and flowers. The impressive determination and efficiency the project commanded seemed calculated to prove to Khartoum’s masses that this is a can-do government.

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Taking Up Space in Tlemcen: The Islamist Occuation of Urban Algeria

An Interview with Rabia Bekkar

by Hannah Davis
published in MER179

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