The US and the Kurds of Iraq

A Bitter Hitory

by Maggy Zanger | published August 9, 2002

As the winds of war steadily gather strength in the West, the Iraqi Kurds walk a tightrope between US interests and Iraqi government threats. Recognizing that it has little control over US decision-making, the Kurdish leadership is struggling to strike a delicate balance between a US-led "regime change" and the preservation of hard-won gains in two self-rule enclaves in northern Iraq.

The "Do More" Chorus in Washington

by Charles D. Smith | published April 15, 2002

Secretary of State Colin Powell arrived in Israel April 11 calling on Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to immediately withdraw Israeli troops from the West Bank. As of April 15, Sharon remains defiant, insisting that his troops must stay until full victory has been achieved. In Washington, Press Secretary Ari Fleischer remarked that Palestinian Authority (PA) head Yasser Arafat had to make greater efforts to stop Palestinian terrorism.

Violence and its Rhetoric

Sharon and the US

by Rebecca L. Stein | published March 28, 2001

No-Fly Zones

Rhetoric and Real Intentions

by Sarah Graham-Brown | published February 20, 2001

Running for Cover: The US, World Oil Markets and Iraq

by Chris Toensing | published September 28, 2000

Last week's panic within the Clinton Administration over a potential winter spike in heating oil prices has greatly eased, as oil prices have begun to fall. The Democrats' political planners feared that Republican candidate George W. Bush and voters would blame Clinton and Vice President Al Gore for failing to forestall the price rise that dominated the news for the last two weeks.

Politics, Not Policy

Behind US Calls for War Crimes Tribunals for Iraq

by Sarah Graham-Brown | published August 25, 2000

In a public break with the US, British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook today submitted a draft parliamentary bill supporting the rapid establishment of an International Criminal Court (ICC) in which to try major war criminals and violators of human rights. The British move to secure the ICC's ratification in Parliament contrasts sharply with the Clinton administration's recalcitrance on the ICC. The US continues to insist on protecting its own nationals from prosecution by the ICC--even at the cost of watering down the court's mandate.