Winds of War, Winds of Peace

The Palestinian Strategy Debate

by Ali Jarbawi , Roger Heacock
published in MER175

The Gulf war transformed the political landscape of the Middle East, and thus the politics of the Palestinian question. Saddam Hussein’s promised “linkage” between the Gulf and Palestinian questions was in fact established, as the US sought to preserve its regional allies from a popular backlash, and thus reinforce its project of a “new international order” to encompass this troubled region. This means unblocking the Arab-Israeli stalemate and moving to solve the Palestinian question, generally recognized as the core component of the conflict.

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Palestine in the New Order

by Azmi Bishara
published in MER175

Since the Gulf war, the Palestinian cause has entered an entirely new phase, one that is not merely a consequence of the war in the narrow sense. The Gulf crisis was the setting for a series of confrontations between local and international forces of such intensity that it is difficult to find a precedent. If the war fit into the formal category of a regional war with foreign intervention, it also had the character of a world war, given the international interests involved.

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Three Intifada Books

by Lucine Taminian
published in MER179

F. Robert Hunter, The Palestinian Uprising: A War by Other Means (I. B. Tauris, 1991).

Joost Hiltermann, Behind the Intifada: Labor and Women’s Movements in the Occupied Territories (Princeton, 1991).

Julie Peteet, Gender in Crisis: Women and the Palestinian Resistance Movement (Columbia, 1991).

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Left In Limbo

Leninist Heritage and Islamist Challenge

by Salim Tamari
published in MER179

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Intifada Memoirs

by Joost Hiltermann
published in MER181

Helen Winternitz, A Season of Stones: Living in a Palestinian Village (Atlantic Monthly Press, 1991).

Gloria Emerson, A Year in the Intifada: A Personal Account from an Occupied Land (Atlantic Monthly Press, 1991).

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Improvisation and Continuity

The Music of Sabreen

by Joost Hiltermann , Kamal Boullata
published in MER182

Sabreen is considered the premier Palestinian musical group performing today. Influenced by Western rock and jazz, their distinctive style blends traditional Arab rhythms and instruments with subtly political lyrics reflecting the current active resistance to Israeli occupation. Two members of Sabreen, lead singer Camelia Jubran and founder and composer Sa‘id Murad, spoke to Kamal Boullata and Joost Hiltermann in Washington. Translated by Dina Jadallah.

Tell us about the history of Sabreen.

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Representing Jerusalem

An Interview with Suad Amiry

by Penny Johnson
published in MER182

Suad Amiry is coordinator of the Palestinian team for the Jerusalem program at the Smithsonian Institution’s 1993 Folklife Festival in Washington. An architect, Amiry is also a member of the Palestinian delegation to the peace talks with Israel. As Middle East Report was going to press, the Jerusalem program was postponed. The interview begins with Amiry’s explanation of the postponement. She discussed the Festival with Penny Johnson, a contributing editor of this magazine, in Ramallah in April 1993.

Why was the Jerusalem Festival postponed?

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The Islamist Movements in the Occupied Territories

by Lisa Hajjar
published in MER183

Iyad Barghouti, professor of sociology at al-Najah University in Nablus, is the author of The Palestinian Islamic Movement and the New World Order (1992) and Islamization and Politics in the Palestinian Territories (1990). He spoke with Lisa Hajjar on May 5, 1993.

How would you describe the appeal of Hamas and other Islamist groups?

Hamas now is the main competitor of the PLO. This is not because the Palestinian people are more willing to turn to religion per se, but because the current situation in the Occupied Territories has led more and more people to see Hamas as a “nationalist” alternative.

Are the situations different in the West Bank and Gaza?

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Israel's Economic Strategy for Palestinian Independence

by Asher Davidi
published in MER184

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