From the Editor

published in MER255

During his second term, his approval rating heading stubbornly south, President George W. Bush was fond of comparing himself to Harry Truman. The dour Missourian, too, was “misunderestimated” -- lightly regarded when thrust onto the world stage and then raked over the coals for strike breaking and a stalemated war in Korea. Like Truman, Bush mused, he would be reviled in his own time only to be accorded great respect in popular history.

World Court's Ruling on Wall Speaks with Utmost Clarity

by Nidal Sliman | published July 27, 2004

The International Court of Justice has rendered its advisory opinion on "the legal consequences arising from the construction of the wall being built by Israel, the occupying power, in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including in and around East Jerusalem." Though the near-term fate of the wall is unclear, subject as it is to international power politics, the Court's ruling, issued on July 9, speaks with the utmost clarity.

The Guantánamo "Black Hole"

The Law of War and the Sovereign Exception

by Scott Michaelsen , Scott Cutler Shershow | published January 11, 2004

Declining to Intervene

Israel's Supreme Court and the Occupied Territories

by Jonathan Cook | published August 4, 2003

On Settlement Trade, Europe Doesn't Stand Tall

by Peter Lagerquist | published April 8, 2003

The transatlantic rift over the war in Iraq, and now post-war reconstruction, builds on growing European disenchantment with muscular US unilateralism. French and German opposition to the war—echoing the sentiments of a majority of the European Union's member states—highlighted seemingly growing differences between European and American attachments to international laws and conventions, underscored by recent trade disputes and wrangling over US attempts to exempt its nationals from the jurisdiction of the new International Criminal Court. Differences between European capitals and Washington have been particularly acute as regards the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Israel, the US and "Targeted Killings"

by Chris Toensing , Ian Urbina | published February 17, 2003

Six Hamas militants killed in a car explosion on February 16 were assassinated by Israel, Hamas claims. While Israel denies involvement in the deaths, the Israeli daily Haaretz reported on February 17 that Israel will assassinate other members of the military wing of Hamas as part of its planned lengthy incursion into Palestinian-controlled areas of the Gaza Strip to avenge four soldiers killed when Hamas blew up a tank near the town of Beit Lahiya in northern Gaza. Israel’s assassination policy is openly declared.

Israel's Accountability for Economic Warfare

by Roger Normand
published in MER217

As Israel escalates the military conflict in the occupied Palestinian territories, brushing aside criticism of excessive force by the United Nations and human rights groups, it is tempting to conclude that international law is irrelevant to the real struggle being waged on the ground with bullets and blood. But the constant interplay between law and force -- in both politics and economics -- has always been, and will remain, a crucial factor shaping the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and its just resolution.

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Universal Jurisdiction

Still Trying to Try Sharon

by Laurie King-Irani | published July 30, 2002